Title I Parents Resource Guide

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WASHINGTON PARK COMMUNITY SCHOOL

Title I Parents Resource Guide
 

 
 
4000 Washington Park Blvd.
Newburgh Heights, OH 44105
216-271-6055
wpcsoh.org
 
 
 
The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (No Child Left Behind) is a landmark in education reform designed to improve student achievement and change the culture of America's schools. President George W. Bush describes this law as the "cornerstone of my administration." Clearly, our children are our future, and, as President Bush has expressed, "Too many of our neediest children are being left behind."
 
With passage of No Child Left Behind, Congress reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)--the principal federal law affecting education from kindergarten through high school. In amending ESEA, the new law represents a sweeping overhaul of federal efforts to support elementary and secondary education in the United States. It is built on four common-sense pillars: accountability for results; an emphasis on doing what works based on scientific research; expanded parental options; and expanded local control and flexibility.
 
What is Title I?
Title I is a federally-funded program that offers assistance to students in the area of Reading and/or Math.
 
Student Eligibility
Washington Park Community School is a school-wide program. This means that every student is eligible to receive Title I services. Students who are identified as “at risk” or “not on track” through teacher referrals and Ohio Achievement Tests will be served by a Title I teacher. School-wide status gives us flexibility in helping other students as well.
 
Policy 2111 Review - PARENT INVOLVEMENT IN THE SCHOOL PROGRAM
The Board of Directors believes that durable and significant learning by a student is more likely to occur when there is an effective partnership between the school and the student's parents. Such a partnership means a mutual belief in and commitment to significant educational goals for a student, a collaboration on the means for accomplishing those goals, cooperation on developing and implementing solutions to problems that may be encountered, and continuing communication regarding the progress in accomplishing the goals.
The Superintendent shall implement administrative guidelines by which a school-parent partnership can be established and maintained throughout the student's career in at the school. Such guidelines should encompass parent participation, through meetings and other forms of communication, in:
  • establishing the learning outcomes for their child with the goal of developing a responsible, adult member of society;
  • developing and implementing appropriate strategies for helping their child achieve the learning objectives that lead to accomplishing the learning outcomes;
  • providing a school and home environment which encourages learning and augments, at home, the learning experiences provided by the school;
  • establishing and supporting a consistent and shared approach to child guidance and discipline
  • providing for the proper health, safety, and well-being for their child.
 
Relations with Parents
The Board feels that it is the parents who have the ultimate responsibility for their children's behavior, including the behavior of students who have reached the legal age of majority, but are still, for all practical purposes, under parental authority. During school hours, the Board, through its designated administrators, recognizes the responsibility to monitor students' behavior and, as with academic
 
matters, the importance of cooperation between the school and the parents in matters relating to conduct.
For the benefit of the child, the Board believes that parents have a responsibility to encourage their child's career in school by:
  • supporting the schools in requiring their child observe all school rules and regulations, and by accepting their own responsibility for their child's willful in-school behavior;
  • sending their children to school with proper attention to his/her health, personal cleanliness, and dress;
  • maintaining an active interest in their child's daily work and making it possible for him/her to complete assigned homework by providing a quiet place and suitable conditions for study;
  • reading all communications from the school, signing, and returning them promptly when required;
  • cooperating with the school in attending conferences set up for the exchange of information of their child's progress in school.
Parent Compact
This agreement between the parent(s), the school, and the student must be between every student/parent/school. When you receive yours from the regular classroom teacher, please return it quickly and you will receive a copy to keep for your files. We appreciate your cooperation with the compacts!!
 
How We Serve Students Reading / Math
“At-Risk” Students will receive instruction by a Title I teachers or Instructional Paraprofessional within their classroom (depending on the skill they were working on) two to four periods per week.
Title I Reading Room instruction will be in small groups during their regular day. The method of instruction depends on the needs of the students and the skill being practiced.
 
How We Gather Input To Guide The Title One Program
The Title I program gathers input from teachers, students and parents through annual surveys. In addition, parents annually receive a Title I compact and program introduction letter. The purpose of the school-parent compact is to build and foster the development of a school-parent partnership to help all children achieve the State's high standards. Responsibility for improved student achievement will be shared by parents, students, and teachers.
 
ARE YOU OR ANYONE YOU KNOW HOMELESS?
McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act
The McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act requires districts to ensure homeless students have access to education and other services they need to meet the same high academic achievement standards as all students.
 
WE CAN HELP!
 
All local school districts must designate a Homeless Liaison.
Our Liaison is: Mr. Robert Horrocks 216-271-6055
 

Questions and Answers on No Child Left Behind...for Charter Schools

What are charter schools and why are they named as a school-choice option under
No Child Left Behind?
 
Charter schools are independent public schools designed and operated by parents, educators, community leaders, education entrepreneurs and others. They operate with a contract, or charter, from a public agency, such as a local or state education agency, an institution of higher education or a municipality. They must meet standards set forth in their charters for students and for the school as a whole, or else the chartering agency can close the school.
No Child Left Behind specifically names public charter schools as a school-choice option for children in schools that are identified for improvement, corrective action or restructuring, because they offer a viable alternative to public schools in the traditional system. In fact, the development of charter schools began in the 1990s as a means of providing expanded educational options for parents within the public school system. Today there are some 2,700 U.S. charter schools serving some 700,000 students nationwide.
 
 
Do all states have charter schools?
 
No. Currently only 39 states have public charter schools laws that provide this option for students. While some states have laws that strongly promote charter school growth, others do not. As a result, the situation varies among states, with thriving charter schools in some and very little or no charter-school activity in others. Parents may contact their local school district or state department of education to determine the availability of charter schools or to find out if there is a mechanism for starting such a school in their area.
 
 
 
How are charter schools held accountable under No Child Left Behind?
 
Although charter schools operate outside the traditional system, they are still accountable. The accountability provisions and other requirements of No Child Left Behind must be applied to charter schools in accordance with the states' charter school laws. State-authorized chartering agencies, as established by the individual state laws, are responsible for ensuring that charter schools meet the accountability and testing provisions of No Child Left Behind. In March 2003, the Department issued guidance on the impact of the new Title I requirements on charter schools, including details on accountability requirements.
 
 
For too many years, too many schools have experimented with lessons and materials that have proven to be ineffective-- at the expense of their students. Under No Child Left Behind, federal support is targeted to those educational programs that have been demonstrated to be effective through rigorous scientific research. Reading First is such a program.
 
Programs and practices grounded in scientifically based research are not fads or untested ideas; they have proven track records of success. By funding such programs, No Child Left Behind encourages their use, as opposed to the use of untried programs that may later turn out to be fads. Furthermore, No Child Left Behind's accountability requirements bring real consequences to those schools that continually fail to improve student achievement as a result of using programs and practices for which there is no evidence of success. Such schools would be identified as needing improvement and required to make changes as outlined in the section on, including using education programs that are grounded in scientifically based research.
 
What is scientifically based research?
 
To say that an instructional program or practice is grounded in scientifically based research means there is reliable evidence that the program or practice works. For example, to obtain reliable evidence about a reading strategy or instructional practice, an experimental study may be done that involves using an experimental/control group design to see if the method is effective in teaching children to read.
No Child Left Behind sets forth rigorous requirements to ensure that research is scientifically based. It moves the testing of educational practices toward the medical model used by scientists to assess the effectiveness of medications, therapies and the like. Studies that test random samples of the population and that involve a control group are scientifically controlled. To gain scientifically based research about a particular educational program or practice, it must be the subject of such a study. Going back to the example of reading: No Child Left Behind requires that Reading First support those programs that teach children five skills (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension). These skills have been shown to be critical to early reading success through years of scientifically based research on the practice of reading instruction. In April 2000, these research findings were reported in the congressionally mandated National Reading Panel report mentioned earlier; they have now been written into the new law.
 
How can parents find out about scientifically based research that applies to federal education programs, aside from the research on reading?
 
In 2002, the Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES) established the What Works Clearinghouse to provide a central, independent and trusted source of scientific evidence on what works in education for parents, educators, policymakers and anyone else who is interested. All of the research collected and conducted by the clearinghouse follows the same high scientific standards as those used for reading research and will be available via the Internet from the clearinghouse or through the Department's Web site.  Parents may be able to use this information to  find out about program and curricula selection at their child's school. The seven topics chosen for systematic review in the first year of the What Works Clearinghouse's operation reflect a wide range of our nation's most pressing education issues. They are:
  • Interventions for Beginning Reading;
  • Curriculum-based Interventions for Increasing K-12 Math Achievement;
  • High School Dropout Prevention;
  • Peer-Assisted Learning in Elementary Schools: Reading, Mathematics and Science Gains;
  • Programs for Increasing Adult Literacy;
  • Interventions to Reduce Delinquent, Disorderly and Violent Behavior, in and out of School; and
  • Interventions for Elementary English Language Learners: Increasing English Language Acquisition and Academic Achievement.
Over time, as the clearinghouse begins to produce its reports on these issues, parents will be able to ask their principal, teachers and school board members about the extent to which they select programs and curricula that the research has determined to be effective. Under No Child Left Behind, educators are expected to consider the results of relevant scientifically based research--whenever such information is available--before making instructional decisions.
 

V. Legal Rights and Responsibilities for Parents of Title I Students

 
Parents Right-to-Know
 
1111 h At the beginning of the year, the district notifies all parents in all Title I buildings that they may request information regarding the professional qualifications of the student's classroom teachers, including: If the teacher has met state qualification and licensing criteria for the grade level and subject areas taught; the teacher is teaching under emergency or temporary status in which State qualifications or licensing criteria are waived; The teacher's baccalaureate degree major, graduate certification, and field of discipline; and Whether the student is provided services by paraprofessionals, and if so, their qualifications.
 
1111 h District provides notices to parents if their children are in schools that are in School improvement. The notices offer Public School Choice (PSC) and/or Supplemental Educational Services (SES), as appropriate.
 
1111 h District provides the following notifications to parents of students in Title I schools:
Timely notice that the child has been assigned to be taught, or has been taught for four or more consecutive weeks, by a teacher who is not highly qualified; and
Information on the level of achievement of the student in each of the State's academic assessment
 
Parent Notification
 
1112 g District provides notification to parents of limited English proficient (LEP) students participating in Title I-funded LEP programs that supplement locally-funded LEP programs.
 
 
Parent Involvement
1118 a District encourages parental input on the use of the 1% of funds.
 
1118 a District plans and implements programs, activities, and procedures for the involvement of parents in Title I programs. District jointly develops with, agrees on with, and distributes to parents a written parent involvement policy that establishes the district's expectations for parental involvement and describes how the district will: Involve parents in the joint development of the CCIP and in the process of school improvement; Provide coordination, technical assistance, and other support to assist schools in planning and implementing effective parental involvement activities to improve student achievement;
Build the schools' and parents' capacity for strong parental involvement by assisting parents in understanding such topics as the State's academic content and achievement standards, academic assessments, how to monitor a child's progress, and how to work with educators, by providing materials and training to help parents work with their children (including literacy and technology training) and by educating teachers, pupil personnel, principals and other staff in the value and utility of the contributions of parents and how to work with parents; Coordinate parental involvement strategies with those under other programs, such as Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, Parents as Teachers, Home Instruction for Preschool Youngsters, and State-run preschool programs (providing support for parental involvement activities as parents request it); Conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of the parent involvement policy, including the identification of barriers to greater participation, especially by parents who are economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background; and Involve parents in the activities of the Title I-served school
1118 a District reserves no less than 1% of its Title I allocation (if over $500,000) for parental involvement activities, including promoting family literacy and parenting skills. 95% of the 1% must be distributed to the schools.
1118 g District informs parents and parent organizations of the existence and purpose of the Ohio Parent Information and Resource Center (PIRC).
1118 c Each Title I-served school convenes an annual meeting to inform parents of their school's participation in Title I, as well as to explain Title I requirements and the right of parents to be involved.
 
1118 c
Each Title I-served school involves parents in an organized, ongoing, and timely way in the planning, review, and improvement of Title I programs, including the school's parent involvement policy and the Schoolwide Plan.
1118 c Each Title I-served school offers a flexible number of meetings (the school may pay the cost of transportation, child care, or home visits for the purposes of parental involvement with Title I funds).
1118 c Each Title I-served school provides parents with timely information about Title I programs, an explanation of the curriculum used in the school, the types of academic assessment used, the proficiency levels students are expected to achieve, and, if requested by parents, opportunities to participate in decisions related to the education of their children.
1118 d Each Title I-served school jointly develops with parents a school-parent compact that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students share the responsibility for improved student achievement, as well as the means by which the school and parents will build a partnership to achieve this end. The compact must:
Describe the school's responsibility to provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment to enable children to meet the State's academic achievement standards, and the ways each parent will be responsible for supporting their child's learning (e.g., monitoring attendance, homework completion, and television viewing; volunteering in their child's classroom; and participating, as appropriate, in decisions related to the education of their child and positive use of extracurricular time); Address the importance of communication between teachers and parents on an ongoing basis through, at a minimum: Parent-teacher conferences in elementary school, at least annually, during which the compact will be discussed as it relates to the individual child's achievement; -Frequent reports to parents on their child's progress; and -Reasonable access to staff, opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child's class, and observation of classroom activities.
1118 e To build capacity for involvement, each school will:
Involve parents in the joint development of the CCIP, and in the process of school  improvement; Provide coordination, technical assistance, and other support to assist schools in planning and implementing effective parental involvement activities to improve student achievement; Build the schools' and parents' capacity for strong parental involvement by assisting parents in understanding such topics as the State's academic content and achievement standards, academic assessments, how to monitor a child's progress, and how to work with educators, by providing materials and training to help parents work with their children (including literacy and technology training) and by educating teachers, pupil personnel, principals, and other staff in the value and utility of the contributions of parents and how to work with parents; Coordinate parental involvement strategies with those under other programs, such as Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, Parents as Teachers, Home Instruction for Preschool Youngsters, and State-run preschool programs (providing support for parental involvement activities as parents request it); Conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of the parent involvement policy,  including the identification of barriers to greater participation, especially by parents who are economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have Limited English Proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background; and Involve parents in the activities of the Title I-served schools.
 
1118 f
District ensures that information related to school and parent programs, meetings, and other activities is sent to parents of Title I children in a format, and to the extent possible, in a language that the parents can understand.
 
Washington Park Community School
Title I Meeting and Progress Conference Schedule 2014-2015
 
 
9/4/14
Open House/Title I Parent Information Meeting 5:30pm-7:00pm
 
9/26/14
Interim Progress Reports 1st Period
 
10/30/14
Fall Parent / Teacher Conferences / 1st Period Report Cards 12:30pm-8:00pm
 
12/3/14
Interim Progress Reports 2nd Period
 
1/21/15
Report Cards 2nd Period
 
2/12/15
Interim Progress Report 3rd period
 
3/19/15
Spring Parent / Teacher Conferences 3:15pm-8:00pm
 
3/26/15
Report Cards 3rd Period
 
5/6/15
Interim Progress Report 4th Period
 
5/11/15
Schoolwide Parent Survey Distribution
 
5/28/15
Report Cards 4th Period
 
5/30/14
CCIP/Schoolwide Plan Evaluation Meeting 9:00am
 
Teacher- Parent Compact for Students
School jointly develops a school-parent compact that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students share the responsibility for improved student achievement, as well as the means by which the school and parents will build a partnership to achieve this end.  Please read over this compact and discuss it with your child. After you have read and understood this agreement, please sign the bottom and return it to your child’s teacher. Student success can only be achieved when schools and parents work cooperatively. We look forward to building a productive educational partnership with you and your family.
Teacher Responsibilities:
1) Have all students performing at grade level by providing high academic standards through the implementation of Direct Instruction
a. Continual student assessment and evaluation
b. Proper placement of students in instructional groups to promote skill mastery
c. Provide supplemental materials for students in order to meet their individual needs
2) Maintain close contact with parent/guardian as to student progress
a. Parent-teacher conferences at least annually, during which the compact will be discussed as it relates to the individual child's achievement.
b. Frequent reports to parents on their child's progress through interim progress reports, report cards, and check sheets
c. Provide opportunities for parents to volunteer and participate in their child's class and observe classroom activities.
3) Continue personal professional growth and development
a. Attend workshops and in-service meetings provided both in and out of the school
b. Analyze research and new techniques of instructional delivery methods
c. Implement new, research based methods in to classroom when appropriate
d. Explore new information regarding curriculum, character, and citizenship
4) Develop and implement an effective Behavior Management plan for the classroom
a. Base management plan on research and use of effective strategies
b. Keep plan in line with the rules, goals, and beliefs of Washington Park Community School
c. Maintain open communication with parents/guardians regarding student behaviors
Parent Responsibilities:
1) Support the educational beliefs and goals of the school
a. Regular communication with classroom teachers…….(Teacher/Parent Check Sheet)
b. Observations of classroom instruction………………..(Visitor Log)
c. Participation in parent/teacher conferences……….…..(Twice a year)
d. Working with students at home on identified needs…. (Teacher /Parent Check Sheet)
e. Monitor all homework and make sure of its completion and submission on a regular basis.
(Teacher/Parent Check Sheet)
2) Promote and support the mission of Washington Park Community School within the community
a. Attend scheduled informational meetings
b. Communicate frequently with staff and administration regarding perceptions, needs, or issues of conflict.
c. Read all informational materials published and distributed throughout the community by the school.
d. Participate in the parent/teacher organization
3) Aid the students in their educational growth and citizenship
a. Volunteer to participate in organized school programs
b. Coordinate or suggest fundraising or collection activities to enable students to help others
c. Support and encourage students in their endeavors to become caring, informed, and respectful citizens of the community
d. Promote the involvement of outside resources through written and/or verbal communication
e. Monitor student attendance to insure that the rate will not drop below 94%.
f. Complete 3-5 lessons a month from teacher supplied materials that reinforce concepts learned in the classroom
 
I have read and understand the above agreement and will work to the best of my ability to fulfill the stated requirements.
 
 
Parent Date
 
Reviewed 8/7/13
 
Washington Park Community School Parental Involvement Policy
The administration and staff at Washington Park Community School believe that the only way a school can be truly effective is to work as a team. This team consists of strong leadership, highly qualified teachers, and active and involved parents. Outlined below are several key components that all parents are expected to try and implement with their children on a frequent basis. This Parent Involvement Policy is an integral part of our School Improvement Plan and will assist in the development of your child. When schools work as a cooperative team, all child can succeed.
 
Washington Park Community School Responsibilities
 
Washington Park Community School will:
 
involve parents in the joint development of the plan, process of school review, and process of improvement of the school by conducting an annual evaluation survey.
 
provide coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary to assist participating schools in planning and implementing effective parent involvement activities to improve student academic achievement.
 
improve school performance by helping the families learn how and when to assist their children in classroom learning activities and provide techniques, strategies, and skills to use at home.  This will be served through the distribution of reading material, websites, and scheduled parent/helper visits to the classrooms to aid in instruction.
 
coordinate and integrate educational strategies of scientifically based researched strategies (SBR) to improve student performance off all students.
 
involve parents in school activities through the Washington Park PTO.
 
explain the requirements and the rights of the parents to be involved in a timely manner through the distribution of the Washington Park Community School Title I Parent Resource Guide. This guide will include: description of parents rights, scheduled meetings, parent/teacher conferences, quarterly report cards, bi- quarterly interim progress reports, description and explanation of the standardized tests students are expected to take.
 
respond to any parent suggestions as soon as practicably possible.
 
distribute a School-Parent Compact, which is a written agreement of what schools and parents are each supposed to do to help students achieve, to all students serviced in Title I Programs within the first 30 Days of School. This compact will outline the responsibilities the classroom teacher and parent will share in order to provide the best possible learning environment for all students.
 
If parents are dissatisfied with the policy, Washington Park Community School shall submit any parent comments with their plan to the State Educational Agency (SEA)/State Department of Education.
 
Reviewed 8/7/14
 
The Ohio Department of Education requires that each local school system that provides services to eligible children in Title I schools establish a Complaint Procedure for addressing concerns raised by the administrators or parents of students in those schools who participate in federal programs.
 
Every effort is made to resolve issues and to answer inquires at the most direct and immediate level. This resolution is facilitated through regular contact between parents
and school representatives. If an issue cannot be satisfactorily resolved in this manner, a formal complaint procedure may be initiated by the parent or administrator from the Title I school.
 
The point of contact for Title I services at Washington Park Community School is Mr. Robert Horrocks, Instructional leader K-5/Title I Service Coordinator. Phone; (216) 271-6055, Fax (216) 271-6099, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Adopted and Approved
 
President Jennifer Kolar Date